Demise of a Great Nation

A cousin in Missouri sent me an email containing the following account of a recent speech given by a former Democrat governor. I think it is something we all need to hear.

We know Dick Lamm as Governor of Colorado. In that context his thoughts are particularly poignant.  Last week there was an immigration overpopulation conference in Washington, DC, filled to capacity by many of America ‘s finest minds and leaders.   A brilliant college professor by the name of Victor Hansen Davis talked about his latest book, Mexifornia, explaining how immigration—both legal and illegal was destroying the entire state of California.   He said it would march across the country until it destroyed all vestiges of The American Dream.

Moments later, former Colorado Governor Richard D. Lamm stood up and gave a stunning speech on how to destroy America. The audience sat spellbound as he described eight methods for the destruction of the United States.  He said, ‘If you believe that America is too smug, too self-satisfied, too rich, then let’s destroy America.  It is not that hard to do.  No nation in history has survived the ravages of time.  Arnold Toynbee observed that all great civilizations rise and fall and that ‘An autopsy of history would show that all great nations commit suicide.”

Here is how they do it,’ Lamm said:

‘First, to destroy America, turn America into a bilingual or multi-lingual and bicultural country…  History shows that no nation can survive the tension, conflict, and antagonism of two or more competing languages and cultures. It is a blessing for an individual to be bilingual; however, it is a curse for a society to be bilingual.  The historical scholar, Seymour Lipset, put it this way:  ‘The histories of bilingual and bicultural societies that do not assimilate are histories of turmoil, tension, and tragedy.’ Canada, Belgium, Malaysia, and Lebanon all face crises of national existence in which minorities press for autonomy, if not independence.  Pakistan and Cyprus have divided.  Nigeria suppressed an ethnic rebellion. France faces difficulties with Basques, Bretons, Corsicans and Muslims.’

Lamm went on:   ‘Second, to destroy America, invent ‘multiculturalism’ and encourage immigrants to maintain their culture.   Make it an article of belief that all cultures are equal; that there are no cultural differences.  Make it an article of faith that the Black and Hispanic dropout rates are due solely to prejudice and discrimination by the majority.  Every other explanation is out of bounds.

‘Third, we could make the United States an ‘Hispanic Quebec’ without much effort.  The key is to celebrate diversity rather than unity.  As Benjamin Schwarz said in the Atlantic Monthly recently:  ‘The apparent success of our own multi-ethnic and multicultural experiment might have been achieved not by tolerance but by hegemony. Without the dominance that once dictated ethnocentricity and what it meant to be an American, we are left with only tolerance and pluralism to hold us together.’   Lamm said, ‘I would encourage all immigrants to keep their own language and culture.  I would replace the melting pot metaphor with the salad bowl metaphor.   It is important to ensure that we have various cultural subgroups living in America enforcing their differences rather than as Americans, emphasizing their similarities.’

‘Fourth, I would make our fastest growing demographic group the least educated.   I would add a second underclass, unassimilated, undereducated, and antagonistic to our population.   I would have this second underclass have a 50% dropout rate from high school.’

‘My fifth point for destroying America would be to get big foundations and business to give these efforts lots of money.   I would invest in ethnic identity, and I would establish the cult of ‘Victimology…’   I would get all minorities to think that their lack of success was the fault of the majority.   I would start a grievance industry blaming all minority failure on the majority.’

‘My sixth plan for America ‘s downfall would include dual citizenship and promote divided loyalties.   I would celebrate diversity over unity.  I would stress differences rather than similarities.  Diverse people worldwide are mostly engaged in hating each other – that is, when they are not killing each other.  A diverse, peaceful, or stable society is against most historical precept.  People undervalue the unity it takes to keep a nation together.   Look at the ancient Greeks. The Greeks believed that they belonged to the same race; they possessed a common language, literature, and they worshiped the same gods.  All Greece took part in the Olympic games. A common enemy, Persia, threatened their liberty.  Yet all these bonds were not strong enough to overcome two factors: local patriotism and geographical conditions that nurtured political divisions.  Greece fell.   ‘E. Pluribus Unum’ — From many, one.  In that historical reality, if we put the emphasis on the ‘pluribus’ instead of the ‘Unum,’ we will ‘Balkanize’ America as surely as Kosovo.’

‘Next to last, I would place all subjects off limits.  Make it taboo to talk about anything against the cult of ‘diversity.’   I would find a word similar to ‘heretic’ in the 16th century, that stopped discussion and paralyzed thinking.   Words like ‘racist’ or ‘xenophobe’ halt discussion and debate.   Having made America a bilingual/bicultural country; having established multi-cultum; having the large foundations fund the doctrine of ‘Victimology,’   I would next make it impossible to enforce our immigration laws.  I would develop a mantra:  That because immigration has been good for America, it must always be good.  I would make every individual immigrant symmetric and ignore the cumulative impact of millions of them.’

In the last minute of his speech, Governor Lamm wiped his brow.   Profound silence followed.   Finally, he said, ‘Lastly, I would censor Victor Hanson Davis’s book Mexifornia. His book is dangerous.   It exposes the plan to destroy America. If you feel America deserves to be destroyed, don’t read that book.’

There was no applause.  A chilling fear quietly rose like an ominous cloud above every attendee at the conference. Every American in that room knew that everything Lamm enumerated was proceeding methodically, quietly, darkly, yet pervasively across the United States today.   Discussion is being suppressed.   Over 100 languages are ripping the foundation of our educational system and national cohesiveness.   Even barbaric cultures that practice female genital mutilation are growing as we celebrate ‘diversity.’   American jobs are vanishing into the Third World as corporations create a Third World in America.   Take note of California and other states.  To date, ten million illegal aliens and growing fast.   It is reminiscent of George Orwell’s book ‘1984.’   In that story, three slogans are engraved in the Ministry of Truth building:  ‘War is peace,’—’Freedom is slavery,’—and ‘Ignorance is strength.’

Governor Lamm walked back to his seat.  It dawned on everyone at the conference that our nation and the future of this great democracy is deeply in trouble and worsening fast.  If we don’t get this immigration monster stopped within three years, it will rage like a California wildfire and destroy everything in its path; especially The American Dream.

Governor Lamm hit a bunch of nails dead center on their heads. Everything he mentioned in his brief speech has been and continues to be a major factor in destroying our nation. I would submit two more things as major contributors to the impending downfall of our country.

The first thing I would add is rampant welfare. The tragic effect of this is best seen in black families. When I was growing up back in the 40’s and 50’s, blacks had to deal with the ills of segregation—but they dealt with it. Black men worked and supported their families. They were a presence in their homes and lent discipline to the children as well as love and support to their wives. They lived with pride, and a very high percentage of black families included two parents at home.

Enter Lyndon Johnson and his Great Society. Massive infusions in our welfare programs made them much more readily available and easier to access. Generations reaching adulthood after this time were much more likely to rely on Big Brother’s dole rather than working and earning an honorable living.

Fifty years later, the percentage of black two-parent families has plummeted. It’s now normal to find a single black woman struggling to raise kids while their father is out somewhere getting stoned or serving time in prison. Whole generations have been raised with little or no work ethic. They spend their time getting stoned like their fathers or rioting against the police, who protect them and all Americans against crime and terrorism.

This trend is not limited to blacks, of course. It’s far too prevalent among whites also. I mention black families simply because of the stark contrast between those of the pre-Johnson days and those of today.

The other factor I would include is our income tax structure. As politicians have sought more and more ways to use their positions and authority to keep themselves in office, we have increased personal exemptions and standard deductions to the point that we now have fewer than 50% of our population paying any taxes at all.

Think on that fact for a moment. Over half our voting age population has no stake at all in taxation. They don’t care if tax rates jump to 99%, since they don’t pay anything anyway. Just bring on more welfare and free healthcare and other such things, regardless of what happens to the poor suckers paying the bill.

Donald Trump was not my favorite candidate. I wanted Ben Carson or Rick Perry or even Carly Fiorina. But there’s one thing to say about Trump—he has the guts to speak his mind and, I suspect, match his actions to his speech. Unlike the wimps who ran against Obama and the wimps who lead Congress, Trump probably has what it takes to press forward with the things that need to be done rather than what may be the most popular. I can only hope it’s not too late.

What do you think needs to be done to halt our nation’s slide into oblivion?

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Benjamin Franklin, exiting Constitutional Convention:

“We’ve given you a republic, if you can keep it.”

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For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

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Duplicity of the Left

This morning’s Fort Worth Star-Telegram had a several-page article exposing the duplicity of the left. Sadly, it was no surprise, since that’s something leftists have long been known for.

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Some months ago, Target made news with its decision to allow people to use whatever restroom they wanted to use, without regard to their actual gender. Most right-thinking Americans abhorred this announcement, but the denizens of the left applauded it. Since they lined themselves up with the left on this, you’d think they—like other leftists—would at least give lip service to championing the underdog.

Now we find that Target has been using undocumented aliens as cleanup crews, paying them as little as $4.35 an hour. They frequently lock them inside the stores until they get their cleaning done and often don’t pay them for all the hours they work. These people are not in a position to complain to authorities since they’re here illegally, so the company can continue these practices with impunity.

According to the newspaper article, this is not an isolated incident or two. These practices are approved at least at the store management level and probably at the corporate management level. If the restroom business didn’t cause you to boycott Target, maybe this will.

Lest I be misunderstood, I am NOT in favor of illegal aliens, and I’m certainly not in favor of giving them benefits at the taxpayers’ expense. However, taking this sort of unfair advantage of any human being is unthinkable and indefensible.

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Benjamin Franklin, exiting Constitutional Convention:

“We’ve given you a republic, if you can keep it.”

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For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

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Wrapping Up the Constitution

Today, we’re looking at the Twenty-seventh (and final) Amendment as we work our way through the Constitution and its amendments.

This post is the last of a series that will make more sense if it is read in order. If you haven’t read the earlier posts in this series, please click here to start with the first one. One reason I’ve broken this series into fairly small parts is that we have a tendency to rush through reading the Constitution and miss a lot of it. I hope the readers of this series will ponder the points in each session. I also hope you will comment on each post as we go along.

Throughout this series on the Constitution, my comments will be in black normal font, and the text of the document will be in this color and italicized.

ARTICLE XXVII.

No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened.

This is a straight-forward and non-controversial amendment to prevent Congress from dipping into the federal till. They can increase their compensation, but no such increase can take effect during their current terms. A somewhat similar Constitutional provision prevents any change in a President’s compensation while he is in office.

It has been my hope this series on the U. S. Constitution would stimulate readers to see and appreciate the importance of this document and of protecting its integrity against the onslaught of attacks from judges and politicians who would pervert the meaning of its words to suit their own purposes. For most of the last century we have had one Supreme Court case after another, one President after another, and all sorts of lesser politicians and pundits trying to change the clear meaning of the document.

Within the next week we will elect a new President. Regardless of whose public face and personality you like, it’s imperative that we deny the Presidency to a candidate who would fill Supreme Court vacancies with hacks who would further dilute and pervert this precious document on which the foundation of our nation rests. I hope every reader will bear that in mind in casting his or her vote.

I would appreciate honest feedback from those who have read all or most of this series. How has it affected your view of our government and political process?

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Benjamin Franklin, exiting Constitutional Convention:

“We’ve given you a republic, if you can keep it.”

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For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

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Twenty-sixth Amendment

Today, we’re looking at the Twenty-sixth Amendment as we work our way through the Constitution and its amendments.

This post is part of a series that will make more sense if it is read in order. If you haven’t read the earlier posts in this series, please click here to start with the first one. One reason I’ve broken this series into fairly small parts is that we have a tendency to rush through reading the Constitution and miss a lot of it. I hope the readers of this series will ponder the points in each session. I also hope you will comment on each post as we go along.

Throughout this series on the Constitution, my comments will be in black normal font, and the text of the document will be in this color and italicized.

ARTICLE XXVI.

SECTION 1. The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.

SECTION 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

This amendment was conceived, passed by Congress, and ratified during the Vietnam War. A bandwagon effect was created by the argument that 18 year-olds were being drafted and forced to serve in a war zone and they should have the right to have a say in our government, which was a complete non sequitur.

To serve as a soldier in the military does not require a lot of independent thinking or wisdom. It requires following orders. To cast an intelligent vote requires both wisdom and independent thinking, tempered by a level of maturity few 18 year-olds have.

As with several other 20th century amendments, this was passed at a time when the Democrat Party pretty much had a stranglehold on government. They controlled the House and the Senate and a majority of state governments, which gave them the power to ram this amendment through. They were upset by the fact that Richard Nixon had been elected President, and they figured they could sway the votes of a bunch of impressionable teenagers, so they rushed this amendment to passage before anyone really thought it through.

What do you think about entrusting the future of our nation and its government to a bunch of teenagers who are barely out of high school and have no life experience to guide them in their decisions?

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Benjamin Franklin, exiting Constitutional Convention:

“We’ve given you a republic, if you can keep it.”

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For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

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Replacing a President

Today, we’re looking at the Twenty-fifth Amendment as we work our way through the Constitution and its amendments.

This post is part of a series that will make more sense if it is read in order. If you haven’t read the earlier posts in this series, please click here to start with the first one. One reason I’ve broken this series into fairly small parts is that we have a tendency to rush through reading the Constitution and miss a lot of it. I hope the readers of this series will ponder the points in each session. I also hope you will comment on each post as we go along.

Throughout this series on the Constitution, my comments will be in black normal font, and the text of the document will be in this color and italicized.

ARTICLE XXV.

SECTION 1. In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President.

SECTION 2. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress.

SECTION 3. Whenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President.

SECTION 4. Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President.

Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive department or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, if Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall continue to discharge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President shall resume the powers and duties of his office.

This amendment was ratified in 1967 in reaction to the vacancy in the office of Vice-President created when Lyndon Johnson became President upon the death of John Kennedy. Prior to this amendment, there was no provision made for filling the office of Vice-President when a vacancy occurred there.

If a vacancy had occurred in the Presidency prior to this amendment, it would have been filled by the Speaker of the House. Behind him, it would have been the President Pro Tem of the Senate, and then a specified order of cabinet secretaries.

The primary purpose of this amendment was to establish procedure for filling a vacancy in the Vice-Presidency. It came into play almost immediately as Nixon made Spiro T. Agnew a fall guy to try to take heat off the Watergate investigations. Upon his resignation as Vice-President, Nixon nominated Gerald Ford as his replacement. Ford subsequently became the only man ever to serve as President without being elected as either President or Vice-President.

If memory serves, Carl Albert, a Democrat from Oklahoma, was Speaker of the House at the time. If not for this amendment, we would have had a Democrat serving out the term of a Republican elected to be President, a weird situation at best.

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Benjamin Franklin, exiting Constitutional Convention:

“We’ve given you a republic, if you can keep it.”

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For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

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Twenty-fourth Amendment

Today, we’re looking at the Twenty-fourth Amendment as we work our way through the Constitution and its amendments.

This post is part of a series that will make more sense if it is read in order. If you haven’t read the earlier posts in this series, please click here to start with the first one. One reason I’ve broken this series into fairly small parts is that we have a tendency to rush through reading the Constitution and miss a lot of it. I hope the readers of this series will ponder the points in each session. I also hope you will comment on each post as we go along.

Throughout this series on the Constitution, my comments will be in black normal font, and the text of the document will be in this color and italicized.

ARTICLE XXIV.

SECTION 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax.

SECTION 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

This amendment was ratified in 1964 under the pretense that a $1.75 to $2.00 tax was so onerous it kept black people from being able to vote. The voices supporting this pretense made a racial issue out of it, since racial equality was a popular subject at the time. Never mind that there were more poor white people than poor blacks.

All pretense aside, this was another power grab by the left, using the racial issue as a guise to obscure their real objective. Bulk registration of dead people and people who didn’t care enough to register themselves costs a lot of money when you have to pay a couple of bucks a head to do it. It’s a lot cheaper when there’s no tax.

This amendment is just one more example of the fact that we need to look beyond the rhetoric when politicians speak. What are they really trying to hide behind their overt talk and actions? What significance will this action have over and beyond the obvious result publicized as the intent of those behind it?

It is said that you can tell when a politician is lying because his (or her) mouth is moving. It’s a little more difficult sometimes to see the real purpose and effect of the actions a politician espouses. We, as citizens, need to be more aware of the need to dig beyond the obvious and see what these people are really trying to accomplish.

What legitimate reasons can you think of for constantly trying to make it easier and easier to register people to vote who are not interested or informed enough to do so themselves?

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Benjamin Franklin, exiting Constitutional Convention:

“We’ve given you a republic, if you can keep it.”

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For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

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Power Politics

This post is part of a series that will make more sense if it is read in order. If you haven’t read the earlier posts in this series, please click here to start with the first one. One reason I’ve broken this series into fairly small parts is that we have a tendency to rush through reading the Constitution and miss a lot of it. I hope the readers of this series will ponder the points in each session. I also hope you will comment on each post as we go along.

We’re slowly working our way through the Constitution and its amendments. Today, we’ll consider the Twenty-third Amendment.

Throughout this series on the Constitution, my comments will be in black normal font, and the text of the document will be in this color and italicized.

ARTICLE XXIII.

SECTION 1. The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as the Congress may direct:

A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least populous State; they shall be in addition to those appointed by the States, but they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of amendment.

SECTION 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

When the nation was founded, the District of Columbia was set up as an entity of its own, separate from any state. As such, it had no Congressional representation and no voice in Presidential elections. In fact, it’s not really even self-governing, but is ruled directly by Congress.

In 1960 the Democrats won the White House back after 8 years of Republican occupancy, and they sought to strengthen their chances of holding it. Knowing that a huge percentage of the population of the District of Columbia consisted of federal employees, who were overwhelmingly Democrat, they put forth this amendment to give themselves three fairly safe electoral votes.

They also controlled most state governments at that time, so ratification was a simple matter for them. Politics has always been a dirty business, and this was power politics at its dirtiest.

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Benjamin Franklin, exiting Constitutional Convention:

“We’ve given you a republic, if you can keep it.”

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For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

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