Fourth Amendment

We’ve finished the original Constitution and are now looking at the amendments. Today, we’ll consider the Fourth Amendment.

This post is part of a series that will make more sense if it is read in order. If you haven’t read the earlier posts in this series, please click here to start with the first one. One reason I’ve broken this series into fairly small parts is that we have a tendency to rush through reading the Constitution and miss a lot of it. I hope the readers of this series will ponder the points in each session. I also hope you will comment on each post as we go along.

Throughout this series on the Constitution, my comments will be in black normal font, and the text of the document will be in this color and italicized.

ARTICLE IV.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

This was another one of the experiences under the king the founders wanted to protect us against. Sometimes this has resulted in allowing lawyers to get evidence tossed out of criminal trials and resulted in letting guilty people go free, but it’s still a protection most Americans wouldn’t want to give up.

——————————————

Benjamin Franklin, exiting Constitutional Convention:

“We’ve given you a republic, if you can keep it.”

——————————————

For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

Advertisements

About David N. Walker

David N. Walker is a Christian husband, father and grandfather, a grounded pilot and a near-scratch golfer who had to give up the game because of shoulder problems. A graduate of Duke University, he spent 42 years in the health insurance industry, during which time he traveled much of the United States. He started writing about 20 years ago and has been a member and leader in several writers' groups. Christianity 101: The Simplified Christian Life, the devotional Heaven Sent and the novella series, Fancy, are now available in paperback and in Kindle and Nook formats, as well as through Smashwords and Kobo. See information about both of these by clicking "Books" above.
This entry was posted in constitution and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Fourth Amendment

  1. I think it might be kind of fun to have the cops search my place. I wonder what they’d think?

    Unless it’s my laptop, then, no way Jose. There’s too much incriminating stuff in my search history for that to ever happen. Hey, I’m a writer, we research weird stuff, like how to poison someone or get rid of a body, or sabotage someone’s car. Like that’s going to hold up in a court of law.

    Patricia Rickrode
    w/a Jansen Schmidt

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sharon Walker says:

    I think our founders were very wise to include this as an amendment to protect our rights.

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.