What Price Independence?

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

If you abide in Me and My word abides in you, then you shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free.

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Please pardon me while I deviate from my normal Tuesday fare. Day after tomorrow is the Fourth of July, the day we celebrate our independence as a nation. We Americans sit around with our lawyers on speed dial to redress any perceived wrong, looking to our government to provide for all of our needs, but is that what our independence is supposed to mean? I’m not sure our forefathers would have suffered as they did to provide us with a cradle-to-grave cushioned life. Please take a few moments at this time to reckon with me on the meaning and importance of our independence and the sacrifices of the people who bought it for us.

You may have seen this before in an email, as I have. I’d be glad to credit the source, but it came unattributed. When I Googled it, I found a number of difference websites claiming credit for it.

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Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.

Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.

What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.

Eleven were merchants; nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly. He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown, Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.

So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots. It’s not much to ask for the price they paid.

Remember: freedom is never free!

For more information about David N. Walker, click the “About” tab above.

For more information about his books, click on “Books” above.

Contact him at dnwalkertx (at) gmail (dot) com or tweet him at @davidnwalkertx.

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About David N. Walker

David N. Walker is a Christian husband, father and grandfather, a grounded pilot and a near-scratch golfer who had to give up the game because of shoulder problems. A graduate of Duke University, he spent 42 years in the health insurance industry, during which time he traveled much of the United States. He started writing about 20 years ago and has been a member and leader in several writers' groups. Christianity 101: The Simplified Christian Life, the devotional Heaven Sent and the novella series, Fancy, are now available in paperback and in Kindle and Nook formats, as well as through Smashwords and Kobo. See information about both of these by clicking "Books" above.
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3 Responses to What Price Independence?

  1. I wonder what they would say about our country today including the Supreme Court and Congress.

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  2. This is powerful stuff, David. I’ve read about our forefathers before, but it always makes me shiver with awe. They were men of honor, to be sure and deserve our gratitude not just on July 4th, but always.

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